WIP - Vogue Couturier Design 2925 and Coat Length!

12:30 PM

I'm currently working on vintage Vogue Couturier Design 2925 from Fabiani from 1973, for the coat sew-along I'm hosting on my other blog The Amazing Sew-Alongs and also in my Facebook group by the same name.  After I had such amazing results with my first vintage coat -- Christian Dior Vogue Paris Original 1023 from 1974. I couldn't go back to a modern pattern for a major coat project.   Clearly coats from that era speak to my soul.  I also purchased Vogue Paris Original 1026, a vintage Balmain also from 1974.  I'm completely hooked on these! 
Outside of the style of these coats are classic and timeless, and drop dead gorgeous, I love the drafting and the instructions.  I love that the pattern comes with interfacing pattern pieces.  
I can't even tell y'all how many hours over the years I've spent drafting interfacing pieces for tailoring projects.  
Tailoring a coat or jacket is detailed and tedious by nature.  
If a couple of steps can be eliminated and the instructions are there without the additional time researching, I am all for this. 

I machine pad stitch because I've learned you don't have to do everything by hand in order to create a beautifully tailored garment.  I have adapted a method from Kenneth King's "Cool Couture", where he uses a Serpentine stitch.  It's #4 on Bernina machines and the stitch width is 5.0 mm and the length is 2.5 mm.  And the question that I'm asked the most about this stitch is:
"Does the stitching show on the other side?"  Yes, it does.  Am I bothered by it?  Nope.  If you are and/or going to make a coat or jacket where the underside of the collar and lapels will be showing, then you may want to do meticulous pad stitching by hand.  I've been there and done it on multiple occasions.  I'm not a fan.  But if it would be the best method for my garment, then I'd do it.  But if I don't have to, I'm not.  There's more than one way to skin a cat!
And I am definitely loving the drama of the collar and lapels!
And here's the back.  

Let's talk about coat length!
This is a dress coat.  And I will definitely be wearing it over dresses and skirts.  I like for my dresses and skirts to fall at or below the knee.  The dress underneath is Vogue 8872, my typical length and the hem of the coat is pinned up 3".  This is a detail that I take into consideration when making a coat.  Your coat SHOULD be the same length as your dress/skirt or longer.  When the hem of your coat falls shorter than your dress/skirt, it's simply NOT flattering.  Just wear a jacket.  This post is directed towards those of us that sew.  Shopping is different, because you have to find what's available, but this is the same direction you should head in also.  And to be honest, if you're sewing your own coat, there is no reason why you shouldn't just alter the pattern to the appropriate length -- if you wear skirts and dresses during the cold months.  The back length of this pattern was originally 40.75" and I adjusted it to 44".  

Just something to be mindful of when making a coat!

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33 comments

  1. I call lapels like that "puppy dog" lapels and love them. Your coat is gorgeous and you will be well equipped when temperatures drop.

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    1. Thanks Faye! I can't wait!

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  2. WOW, LOVING the coat so far!

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  3. It's looking gorgeous -- what a great pattern. Looking forward to seeing the finished coat!

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  4. OMG! Gorgeous, I'm right there with you on vintage coat patterns. Your Fabiani is beautiful That lapel, the front cross, the extra fabric in the back held by the martingale, it's too much, I love it!

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    1. Ines, I love the martingale detail. I fell in love with that from my camel hair coat. I knew I wanted to do it again! Thanks!

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  5. Great coat!!!! I am busy with a 1970's coat also and just love the classic style.Thankyou so much for info on length.I wasn't sure,just on the knee for me.

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    1. Don't you just love coats from that era?! Thanks SarahsDaughter!

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  6. Absolutely gorgeous Erica, and thanks for letting us in on the details for machine pad stitching......I see machine pad stitching mentioned in so many books, but not the instructions on stitch selection. Yay, I have a Bernina, so all ready to go on that one.

    Coat is looking fabulous, and the buttons too; where did you get them from, just out of interest?
    This is going to look absolutely stunning on you.

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    1. The buttons are from Jo-Anns. When I don't have time to order, I just find the best buttons available locally. These are glass and the vintage style goes perfectly with this coat. Thanks Marysia!

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  7. This is going to be stunning when you're finished. Interesting to know about the pad stitching.

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  8. So happy you picked the Fabiani. I was rooting for it! Can't wait to see this made up. Your taste and style are impeccable as always!

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  9. That is looking just amazing - can't wait to see the finished product! I agree about the pad stitching - if you can save time by machining then go for it.

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    1. I know, right! Thanks Nicole!

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  10. I was in my twenties and early thirties in the 60's and 70's; still love the elegance, and fun, of each decade.
    To me, the pad stitching looks great, as if you purchased special quilted fabric for the undercollar. I have that book and should look up that technique. By the way, I agree with you about the coar length.,

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  11. I made that coat in the fall of 1974 in a camel wool. Nice work.

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  12. Erica, you have an awesome gift, I have seen the coats you make and I tell you they are as though they come from a high end designer.... (..hence that's who you are)... God Bless you continuously lady...... simply impeccable work...

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    1. Thanks so much JI Designs!

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  13. What a gorgeous coat. I look forward to seeing you model it. It is coming along beautifully. I too have used Kenneth King's technique and find that it does the job quite well - definitely a timesaver!

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  14. That pattern is fantastic! I must find a copy. Your version is looking fabulous as always!!

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  15. Erica do you do the pockets first before the hair canvas...and how you attach the hair canvas to the fashion fabric? ??

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    1. No... afterwards. My coat does not have cut in pockets though. But on the tailored jacket that I'm also working on that has welt pockets, the hair canvas is done first.

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  16. ooo i have this pattern and have always wondered..yours is looking really great :-) such a great collar on this pattern.

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    1. The collar is my favorite detail. Thanks Allison!

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  17. This is beautiful. I even pulled out one of my favorite coat patterns (not vintage, but it's one of my personal favorites). You've made me want to make another coat, even though I said I wouldn't! 😉

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