A Faux-Fur Leopard Print Coat!

8:00 AM

Vogue 9123 - Faux Fur Leopard Coat - Erica Bunker DIY Style-1I'd been wanting to add a faux fur leopard print coat to my wardrobe since last year and I finally found the perfect fur! It's the Brown and Beige Leopard Printed Stretch Faux Fur from MoodFabrics.com.

I'd seen this coat and knew that I wanted a similar minimal design (i.e. limited seaming) for working with faux fur. I reached for Vogue Patterns 9123, that I'd previously used in plaid wool.collage I used the same size as before, the size 14. I probably could've gone with a 12, but I wanted to make sure that I had enough wearing ease to put this on over a thick sweater. Vogue 9123 - Faux Fur Leopard Coat - Erica Bunker DIY Style-6
This pattern has back shoulder darts and elbow darts. I eliminated these for the fur, but kept them for the lining.
Vogue 9123 - Faux Fur Leopard Coat - Erica Bunker DIY Style-3
Cutting and laying out faux fur is pretty simple. You just have to always keep in mind that you're working with a fabric that has a nap. Fur looks best with the nap brushed down. So that's the way all of the pieces should be laid out. Also, it goes without saying that this is a messy process because it gives new meaning to "the fur will fly". And it will... all over the place.
Vogue 9123 - Faux Fur Leopard Coat - Erica Bunker DIY Style-2   For sewing, I used a universal size 12 needle and my BERNINA Walking Foot. Vogue 9123 - Faux Fur Leopard Coat - Erica Bunker DIY Style-5
Since my faux fur has stretch, I added a back stay to stabilize that area. The pattern also suggest shoulder pads. I made my own from cotton batting.
Vogue 9123 - Faux Fur Leopard Coat - Erica Bunker DIY Style-7
 My lining is this Ultra Brown Sold Polyester Satin
collage2 I used the facings, but omitted the interfacing. And I bagged my lining.Vogue 9123 - Leopard Coat - Erica Bunker DIY Style-2For closures, I picked these beautiful Brown Nylon Snaps. Vogue 9123 - Faux Fur Leopard Coat - Erica Bunker DIY Style-8I love the way this coat turned out. And I'm so happy to have found this fabric to create my fabulous statement coat!      

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24 comments

  1. Hi Erica...I'm working on a faux fur coat as well. I was wondering what to do about the interfacing. I am going to omit it as well and add a back stay. However, I was wondering is there are other options if I did want to interface??

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    1. I would use a heavyweight cotton muslin if interfacing was absolutely necessary. That's what I used for my backstay. Thanks Lora!

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  2. A beautiful coat you carry off so well.
    A tip when sewing fur, not mine, when my Mother cut fur (real fur), she used a razor blade. Really old fashioned type, blade on one side and a type of cover on other which meant your fingers were safe. I think a scalpel would be a good tool to use for this. She cut from wrong side only, there was very little fur flying about. I'm pretty sure this was the method used for real fur and I'm sure it works equally well on faux fur. I'll find out soon as I'm about to make my 7yr old granddaughter a fur jacket and long gilet, I think you call those a vest! She was a skilled dressmaker and worked in a tailors for many years. By the way, this was 50's 60's and 70's here before people stopped using real fur as there was such opposition to it. I don't think she was sorry as she didn't like working with animal skin, borne out by the fact she was given a superb fur coat, unbeknownst to the benefactor, we used it for dress up and lying on. That was about 1955! So I know she didn't hold it in high regard. As the quality of faux fur improved she couldn't understand why anyone would wear real when faux was of such good quality. I can wholeheartedly agree with her.

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    1. I used a similar method the last time I worked with a long-haired fur: http://www.ericabunker.com/2015/11/review-mccalls-7257-faux-fur-gilet.html

      Since this one has short hair, I used my rotary cutter because I rarely ever cut out anything with scissors.

      Thanks Janet!

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    2. My grandmother was a furrier who re-fashioned and repaired fur coats, jackets,and stoles (40s - 60s). She, too, cut the fur with a razor blade and sewed the seams with a special machine just for that purpose. As a child I loved touching the furs in her home studio. Erica's coat is lovely faux fur. Karen

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  3. Hi Erica....one last questing....when setting in the sleeve did you use your sleeve head method where you use a strip of fabric to gather the sleeve head??

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    1. I didn't. Even though this is faux fur it's still pretty lightweight and it has stretch. I set it the flat method.

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    2. Thank you so much:)

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  4. question...sorry about that..lol

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  5. GORGEOUS COAT!!! It is beautiful and it looks great with the blue blouse and the jeans. You look fabulous!

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  6. I am so happy you made this coat - now I can make one! It is beautiful and love it. My New Year project. Will send photo when complete.

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    1. Thank you! I look forward!

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  7. Hi Erica! Your coat looks great! I'm new to sewing, so sorry for the silly question. You said you left out the darts on the fur, which I understand why, but why do you have the darts on the lining? Again sorry; I'm sure this is obvious to everyone else!

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    1. It still requires shaping and ease. The same way you'd see a draped gown, but there's a structured foundation underneath. Thanks Heather!

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    2. Ahh! Thanks for replying, Erica!

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  8. Love your coat. I bought this same fabric - just deciding on a coat pattern.

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  9. Awesome Awesome! Coat.Dee

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  10. Awesome Awesome! Coat.Dee

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