Vogue Patterns - Fall 2019

12:00 PM

It's been a long time since I've been truly interested in a pattern release. Sure, I always see the possibility in one or two. Maybe they're something I can hack into something I actually want. But, I want to sew these straight from the envelope! 

In probably the last decade, it seems as though Vogue Patterns has gotten squeamish about releasing high end designer looks with complicated details. People that don't want to stretch their sewing skills always complain so badly. And then there are the ones that can't see pass a knit top and shapeless pants (nothing wrong with that if that's what you like, but leave other folks alone!), are always like, "OMG! Who's going to wear that?!" Believe it or not, there are a lot of people that love fashion while simultaneously love sewing. Go figure. I grew up loving all of the Vogue American Designer Original and Vogue Couture patterns and the dreamy french designer Vogue Paris Original. Those were the golden days of Vogue Patterns. Back then, sewing a designer pattern felt as though you were taking a couture sewing masterclass. You would learn so much.

Enough of the reminiscing... let's talk about what's current...
Vogue Patterns 1650 - #V1650
There's a new Guy Laroche, V1650. It's a trench coat and it's good!

A trench coat was on my list for fall. But I like this one so much better than the vintage one I had in mind. I like the set in sleeves on this one. It doesn't have the classic epaulets, but it does have the front gun flap and the storm shield on the back. And also a vent and unique belt carriers.
Vogue Patterns 1649 - #V1649
This coat is Vogue 1649, and it's a pretty good replica of this one:


At first, I was immediately dead set against the grosgrain border. BUT... then I saw the runway version, with the fringe. It may be an option. But I do love it in a solid color.
Vogue Patterns 1643 - #V1643
Even if you don't give a shit about fashion, the details on Vogue 1643 are so iconic, like how could you not recognize that Gucci trim?

This one is so good and a must have wardrobe pattern. I think I'll get my money's worth out of this one.
Vogue Patterns 1645 - #V1645
The Rachel Comey Steadfast Jumpsuit has been in saved on one of my Pinterest boards for months. I've been in love with this for a long time. I even stole the belt detail for my recent white jumpsuit
Rachel Comey Steadfast Jumpsuit

I was think the entire time that Vogue Patterns should release this one. And lo and behold they did with Vogue 1645. Now I plan of making the real thing in a fall appropriate color.
Rachel Comey Steadfast Jumpsuit
It even looks good with a top underneath. Which is a definite plus!
Vogue Patterns 1636 - #V1636
Vogue 1636, is inspired by Oscar de la Renta.
It was worn by Meghan, Duchess of Sussex last September.

And the other ones that definitely need a place in my wardrobe are:
I love the full skirt. This will look stunning worn with tall boots.
I've made draped hem skirts before, but I still like this one too.


I don't have any pants in this cut in my closet. And a simple black pair would be a good addition.

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28 comments

  1. Love these looks, now we await for the Vogue patterns to go on sale.
    Thanks Erica

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  2. I love every outfit on that Gucci envelope. I NEVER say that about a pattern! I wish I could sew on that level. And that McQueen coat? I die.

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    Replies
    1. Roslyn,

      If you can sew period, you can. It just takes time and focus.

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  3. I am glad that I was not the only person who that Vogue was not at it's full potential as patterns. One of the reasons I wanted to sew was because of the great Vogue Couture patterns back in the day. You could depend on Vogue having a pattern for every trend. Then over the years, everything went down hill. I agree with you on if you want to play it safe and not branch out to other techniques, that is fine. But sewing, like any other craft, is testing new areas and growing. Do not hinder the rest of us. I am excited about this new collection. Vogue is back with a vengeance!

    Kimberly Wilkes

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    Replies
    1. These are truly some great patterns. Even if I don't get around to sewing them all, they will definitely make it to my collection.

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  4. I love Vogue Patterns and I can remember being given my first Vogue American Designer Original by my Mother. It made me very interested in American Sportswear. I love this collection because it has good options and some real challenges. I will most certainly be sewing more than one garment from this collection.

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  5. This seems,to have become a huge expectation on the internet: everything must be what I want.

    I have a very simple,life in a small town and the frocks and jackets and dressy items by Vogue do not fit where I live or my lifestyle but THAT IS OKAY.

    Not everything must suit you to be worthwhile to the rest of the world. Let those who have occasion and desire have their dressy, complicated items. There is aleays somewhere else to find a pattern.

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    Replies
    1. Lynn,

      That is so well-said. It's such an epidemic to think if I don't like it, it shouldn't exist. And I'm sure it happens everywhere, but it seems so prevalent in the sewing community. There are indie pattern companies popping up as I type this. It's something out there for everyone!

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  6. I'm having a hard time with the proportions of V1640 -- those flared pants with those boots -- but otherwise this looks like a pretty snazzy collection!

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    Replies
    1. I agree, Peter. But if I based my pattern purchases on the envelope styling, I'd never purchase anything. I love a tall, slim fitting boot under culottes and cropped pants. Definitely not that short boot.

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  7. I agree Erica. Vogue was the go to pattern company if you wanted to sew good garments. I learnt to sew with Vogue Paris Originals - I miss the high quality designer patterns so much. I looked at a Vogue pattern catalogue yesterday and did not buy a thing - all so easy to sew, repetitive and boring. Bring back the old Vogue - there are plenty of us that would buy these more complex patterns.

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  8. I'm so glad you posted this. I love that Vogue is getting back into the couture game. You learn so much working through some of those patterns. Your point about getting away from the "knit top/shapeless pant" syndrome is the real talk. I see that a lot in not just the big 4, but especially in the indie patterns too. Don't get me wrong, I love my classics and basics, but some pattern selections seem repetitive.

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  9. Erica..these new Vogue patterns were designed for you! Long legs will look longer! I am on the short side and live in a tropical climate but do feel that several patterns would work for me; after alterations, of course. I am anxious to see your interpretations.

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  10. I love to reminisce about the old Vogue designer patterns! They were wonderful! I used to tell people that they often weren't as hard as they looked--they just had more steps than the simple patterns. I hope these new patterns are a taste of more interesting things to come, although I've read that because of the restructuring of the fashion industry (more large conglomerates, fewer smaller design houses) it's difficult for pattern companies to negotiate contracts for sewing patterns because the new, large conglomerates think that sewing patterns aren't an important part of their business.

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  11. It is so exciting to see a collection that isn't based entirely on blocky shapeless patterning that is easy to sew and fit. I'm just a novice sewist, but love the vintage patterns because of the interesting details. The same thing applies in the knitting world, 95% of all new patterns are shapeless designs for beginning level knitters. Makes me wonder if the desire to explore and learn and take time to do challenging work is not longer being developed in our society. Why do so few people want to challenge themselves? Going to make that coat if it takes me all year...

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  12. I was already sewing awhile when I started sewing Vogue designer patterns. That's when I really learned how to sew. Nothing was too difficult for me to attempt; they were so fabulous I pushed my skills. The directions as you mentioned,were a sewing book in themselves. When we bought our first home my neighbor was an expert garment sewer and she became my mentor. She also gave my first sewing book, the 1973 edition of the Vogue sewing book. Between the patterns and the book I really grew as a seamstress. I sewed Geoffrey Beene, Bill Blass, Issey Miyake when he was still designing. I sewed some other French designers, though I honestly can't remember. The above just have stuck in my mind over the years. It's my understanding that when fashion houses were bought up by the big companies they were no longer interested in selling licenses to Vogue or that Vogue patterns could no longer afford them. These offerings and the ones that were designed in house are so much better! Real fashion. This is the best development at Vogue in years! Sure, like you I can alter patterns to knock off designers, but I agree, it's so much nicer to actually get them that way out of the envelope! That Montana is fabulous. Enjoy!

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  13. Yes! I grew up watching Mom sew her Vogue patterns and she still almost exclusively sews Vogues to this day. I used to spend a fair amount of time as a child just looking through those patterns and she still has most of them. I really want a trench for fall myself so this post was a nice mix of nostalgia and timeliness. V1633 may be just right for an event I have this fall too. Had planned on another dress, but V1633 is just WOW. Thanks Erica

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  14. Guy Laroche, not Montana!

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  15. I love this analysis of their pattern release! If it doesn't interrupt your awesome sewing reviews, please continue reviewing upcoming lines!

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  16. V1636, V1633 😍😍. I wouldn't consider myself a fashion sewer, but I have been 'bored' with the choices as of late. I loved Vogue's 'Divine Details' series of patterns awhile back. The only thing I see now close thoses are Tom Lydia Platt and again they don't have the same detail. Once again nice choices πŸ‘

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  17. Yes, yes, yes and Yes!!! Thanks for posting these high fashion numbers. Like you it’s what I live for, obviously I also need the more regular patterns but it frustrated me so much when I noticed less of the high end design patterns , and I also kept reading reviews that would say Who would wear that!! And I would think ME! I actually even sent a letter, well email, to their staff letting them know how important to some customers the high end fashion items are, not all of us want 10 jersey knit skater dresses, apparently these were big in the blogging community then. They even replied and said they would keep up the designer patterns and that they understood. Guy Laroche is a favorite of mine. In any case it’s such a thrill to see off the runway patterns that are worth in the thousands .... right there in a patttern. Can’t wait to see which ones you’ll make, which will be to die for. One that comes to mind is the Donna Karon laced Jacket you made, amazing! Thanks for this great post!

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  18. Erica!! Great post! I am so happy to see some patterns that I actually love. I respect vogue patterns but for a long time I didn't see anything that what jump out and said "Girlllll now this is a pattern!" It also, gives me hope that I don't have to hack patterns all of the time to get the fashion forward styles I love. I do think I will still hack as I still love doing that. But this makes me smile. Thank you for also sharing some great inspiration pieces.
    xoxo That's Sew Monica

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  19. Couldn't agree more. I follow you because you constantly correlate sewing AND fashion. You're the Gal that will wear THAT!! Loving some of these new picks as well. Great post!!

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  20. Oh be-still my beating heart...These are gorgeous! Vogue is back, hallelujah!
    I can feel many purchases coming on.

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  21. Very cool pieces, thanks for highlighting them! I love the dress in particular.

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  22. I love the trench coat and the pleated skirt in the Gucci ensemble. This is the first time I have been excited about a current Vogue Patterns release – I usually just try to collect older ones, starting from 10–15 years ago (although one exception in recent years were Paco Peralta's patterns, of which there is one in this collection).

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